Welcome to Plett

After 2 layovers, a day spent in London and roughly 23 hours of air travel, I walked off the plane and onto the runway in George. With the distant views of sea and mountains, the fatigue momentarily disappeared as I was overcome with excitement.

13 hr layover? no problem
13 hr layover? no problem
sunrise in the clouds
sunrise in the clouds

I’m doing my internship at the African Array Lodge in Plettenberg Bay. A coastal town with a plethora of activities for adrenaline junkies and nature lovers alike. The lodge itself is perched on a hill, overlooking the ocean to the East and forest and valley to the West. The lodge is beautiful and has a warm, homey feel; attracting travellers from across the globe. I’ve had the pleasure of working with two girls from Belgium and France, and meeting guests from Israel, the Netherlands, Germany, South Africa, the UK and the USA.

Highlights of my first few weeks include hiking the nearby Robberg Peninsula, visiting Monkeyland (a sanctuary for monkeys) and spotting dolphins on the beach in town.

hiking Robberg
hiking Robberg
Robberg Penninsula
Robberg Penninsula

Stay tuned, more adventures to come.

Kirstie

Finding A Voice and Becoming a Leader

It took me a while to find my voice in Nicaragua. In a group of 23 leaders, it was difficult to feel like I had a say or could sway an opinion. We had a few group members who were obviously born to be leaders; They had strong, confident and inclusive personalities that made everyone feel heard. I have always found that when no one is willing to step up and take a lead, I will happily take on the role. However, with so many people eager to fill that position, I was finding it hard to speak up. Throughout the week I began to remember that I was chosen to take part in this GCELE for a reason.  I grew more confident as the week went on, and began to feel more comfortable speaking up and working as a leader. I remembered that I am a good public speaker, and fortunately, I had plenty of opportunities to use that sIMG_5499kill on this trip. It was very rewarding to collaborate with all of the unique and inspiring personalities involved with this GCELE, and we all had a chance to merge as leaders throughout the week. Despite all of our different leadership styles, we worked together and taught our health initiatives successfully. Not only were we able to help a community, we were also able to grow as a group and as individuals.

  • Amy Mepham, Nicaragua 2015

Listening with my eyes

I knew that going to a new country and communicating with a language barrier would be a challenge. I will admit that I was worried about it. How am I going to connect with them? How will we build a relationship if we don’t understand each other? I wasn’t too anxious about it, but these thoughts were certainly on the back of my mind.

To my surprise, it wasn’t nearly as difficult as I had imagined! We did have the help of translators when we were presenting health information to a group but for one on one things we often did it by ourselvesNicaragua. It was a very interesting and enlightening experience because for the first time in my life, I was listening with my eyes. People would explain their body aches and pains and instead of listening to the words they used, I was listening to how they told their story, when they used inflictions to emphasize a point, or when they used gestures to explain that something was important. I have always been a good listener but I have never consciously noticed how much people speak with their bodies. Through these expressions, gestures and varying tones of voice I was able to understand what was being said to me, as well as communicate back. By the end of the trip I had learned tons of techniques for communicating across a language barrier, and realized that I had nothing to worry about in the first place.

  • Amy Mepham, Nicaragua 2015

Habitat for Humanity and the Learning

The last blog I wrote I talked about specific experiences that were very valuable in my learning throughout my trip in PEI. This one is more about what Habitat is all about and the learning that I experienced personally. First off Habitat for Humanity is a not for profit organization that helps families that are in need of affordable housing. To qualify you must make a certain amount of money a year, put in 500 hours of volunteer work for Habitat and the family also pays a mortgage back to Habitat for Humanity and that money goes to making another Habitat house for another family. That is pretty incredible in my mind because the families put in the time and buy paying the mortgage of there house Habitat is able to provide other families with the same opportunities to fit their needs.

Personally I did not know what to expect going on a GCELE for Habitat for Humanity within Canada. There are differences in culture even in the same country! Their highways are different, their traffic lights are different, the air is different and the people are different. They are so relaxed, calm and friendly. You hardly ever go out without seeing someone you know. I personally like this small tight community because I am a very friendly and social person who loves to talk. There was a lot more physical work than I expected! Our team and myself personally pushed ourselves above and beyond what I thought I and our team was capable of. I never envisioned myself shingling a roof. That was an incredible and confidence boosting experience. It was also an emotional and mental roller coaster. We had to learn how to work with others who come from all different backgrounds, cultures and beliefs. We also lived in very close proximity to each other for 8 days which can be tough having little privacy. Being able to mentally and emotionally prepare yourself to get out of bed even when I was exhausted and sore was hard. But something I always said throughout this trip was that this trip was not about me. Every time I said that I was able to move forward. I became mentally and emotionally stronger because I was tired, sore and still worked. If you got hurt we would stop pull ourselves together and keep going. That’s just how our team worked. We worked so well as a team and their is no other group of people I would of rather built this house with than them.

Thank you to Centennial College, Habitat for Humanity PEI and all the people that made this trip possible. I truly learned a lot and can proudly and confidently say I am a stronger person physically, mentally and emotionally.

This is just a little video I put together about my team and I on our trip and the experiences we had the opportunity to have!

Rebecca Harber

Habitat for Humanity PEI

GCELE PEI Team 1

Early Childhood Education Program

Coming Full Circle

Stepping out of the metro into the modern metropolis that is Shanghai was a bit of a culture shock having been where we were. We started our trip in the mountains, where many of the sights we saw resembled something out of National Geographic. We had ventured to a secluded pocket of the world where people had seldom seen Westerners. They would stare in awe as we drove by, and let me tell you, our multicultural group was a sight to be seen in Butuo.
Moving back down to the city, I noticed a change in the girls we were working with. They were more adapt to modern day living and the outside world. They were more confident and self aware. The changes were there, however, I was still fascinated by their overwhelming kindness and eagerness to help whenever possible.
From the mountains to the city, the Yi, in my mind, defined down to earth. They were kind and grateful, and happy with what they had; even when that wasn’t a lot. They live a simple life and worship the elements; fire and water. I learned a lot during our time with them.
First and foremost, I learned to be grateful for everything in my life, for my loving family and friends, for my education, for my possessions and for my rights. I think we often forget that we live in the upper percentage and that there are millions of people around the world living below the poverty line.
I learned to be happy with what I have and that I may not need as much as I once thought. There will always be someone happy with less than I have.
I learned not to sweat the little things. Some things really just don’t matter in the grand scheme of life.
I learned that kindness really does go a long way. Even with language barriers, friendships were quickly and easily formed.
I learned to always stay positive. With hard work and determination you really can do anything. How far these girls, and other Fu Hui students we had the chance to meet, have come is an inspiration.
I am confident this GCELE team will continue to work with Fu Hui in any way they can. The girls we had the pleasure of working with may be out of sight, but will not soon be out of mind.

-Kirstie Keys

Last day in China!
Last day in China!
Shanghai, the Bund
Shanghai, the Bund
Team 3
Team 3
Ferry ride on the lake. Most of the girls had never been on a boat before!
Ferry ride on the lake. Most of the girls had never been on a boat before!
Stop 1: Guangfu Temple
Stop 1: Guangfu Temple
Students having lunch in Butuo
Students having lunch in Butuo
Taking a peek at the village
Taking a peek at the village
Home visit
Home visit
Making our way into Butuo County
Making our way into Butuo County

Guatemala: Heart of Maya World

I was thrilled to hear my professor Marg announce that she would be going back to Guatemala to continue her work. I submitted my application on the very first day, and was already planning my trip before the acceptance letter. A few months later, I landed at Flores airport. That was unreal.

The purpose of our trip was to teach the local midwives how to use a birthing simulator MamaNatalie, teach the local women how to make reusable menstrual pads, and provide First Aid training to the local health promoters. We visited six different communities throughout our stay, and each community was unique in its own way. Most of the communities we visited are Q’eqchi’, the Maya people, hence it requires double translation from English to Español, then to Kekchi. It was challenging, but in a positive way.

I didn’t really experience “culture shock,” definitely some “culture surprises” during our stay in Guatemala. Photos speak a thousand words, hence I will walk you through our wonderful journey through photos. Have some tortilla chips ready, sit back and relax.

Day 1: Our flight is TO -> Miami -> Guatemala city -> Flores, then finally a two-hour bus ride to Sayaxche, It was tiring, but we were warmly greeted by the heat wave in Guatemala.

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Landed at Flores airport at night. Finally! Everyone was exhausted after a long ride.

Day 2: Flores -2 hours smooth bus ride to Sayaxche
Meeting with Apidec (Programa Integral de desarrollo Christiano) & World Renew staffs. Had a crazy ride in a “cage” to our first village. I was chosen to be the first to do MamaNatalie (meaning I have to fake birthing). I knew I did an awesome job because everyone outside heard my screams from the classroom. Some said my hysterical screams scared some babies and kids oops. There is  no bridge to cross the river in Sayaxche, so we had to take the ferry. Unfortunately on our way back to the hotel, a truck was stuck on the ferry and we waited for an hour before crossing a small river. Apparently the government made big profits from the ferry, so bridges are unnecessary. We had to hide in the jungle for toilet break! We were still full of awesomeness but began to feel the heat wave eating away our energy.

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Typical Guatemala food: red beans, rich, eggs and salad. Thank all the communities for the lunches 🙂

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I was demonstrating MamaNatalie, a birthing simulator helps to create realistic training scenarios, it was awkward doing it but so much fun!

Day 3: Meeting with the Ministry of Health of Guatemala (Gobiernode Guatemala Ministerio de Salud Publica y Assistencia Social) in the morning. Visited our second village “San Juan Acul” in the afternoon. This village has a huge shelter outside. Sweat was pouring down, but the hot & humid breeze meant so much to us! I’ve said “mi nombre Beidi” so many times. Awesome but the heat was unbearable. We definitely had an awesome time at this community all thanks to the shelter that they have.

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Meeting with Ministry of Health. Learned a lot about Guatemala from this meeting.
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Roya was teaching First Aids to the local health promoters.
Muchas gracias shelter!
Muchas gracias shelter!

Day 4: Third village “Herencia Maya” meaning Heritage Maya. Most residents only know Kekchi, a Mayan language, so we have to translate from English to Spanish then to Kekchi (most communities we visited are Q’eqchi’ so triple translations hence triple the fun, and most of the communities were receiving visitors for the very first time, not to mention first foreign visitors). I used leftover fabrics to make  and stars to the kids and they love it so much. This heat was overwhelming… people were starting to get sick 😦

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DSC_0882 Both girls and boys were so helping with menstrual pads. Muy bien! 🙂
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Group photo time! Wearing scrubs wasn’t that bad at all. Slowly getting used to the heat.

Day 5: Visit to Tikal, the Mayan ruins! Everyone was excited though we were not feeling well. The heat was not bad, bearable. Awesome day!

Scary stairs, took us forever to get down.
Scary stairs, took us forever to get down.
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Guatemala national tree: Ceiba

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Amazing view of Tikal

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Tour guide & selfie stick

Day 6: Boating to the zoo in the morning, and had a fabulous view of Flores from far. Was a little upset that we had to cancel our afternoon trip to another ruin 😦 but at least we went to a good restaurant and I got a super yummy chicken sandwich and a Jamaican Rose drink. Got a super-itchy spider bite, and the rash was crystal-like. Finally started raining on the way back to Sayaxche, it cooled down the heat.

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Flores island

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Day 7 & 8: Can’t remember what exactly happened during these two days. I was drained, and totally shutting down. I remembered the tables were so small and low, I have to bend down all the time while surrounded by groups of women and children. The noise, the heat, and the environment was sweeping over me like waves after waves. Due to the heat and long bus ride, more people felt unwell. I forced myself to drink lots and lots of water, and I survived the hardest period during this trip.

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UV light our water
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Teaching CPR

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Day 9: Visited the last community! The kids there were overwhelming. They dragged you everywhere, touched your hair, put their little hands in your pocket digging for stuffs. I went to the bathroom with ten kids surrounding the door. Last time using MamaNatalie, my energy level left only 10% while doing it. A long day ended with kids holding my hands, grabbing my leg, and singing my name.

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Day 10: Meeting with Ministry of Health again with reporters, and many cameras. Seemed like we’ll all be in Peten news! Our efforts had been paid off. Our MamaNatalie, menstrual pads, and First Aid sessions benefited the locals so much that the MOH will continue teaching the midwives and women with MamaNatalie and menstrual pad making. I felt so grateful. Drove back to Flores and finally SHOPPING TIME!!! (didn’t buy a lot because I was… exhausted). Day ended with a two-dollar ice cream.

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Team work makes the dream works!

Day 11: Guatemala City was raining and flight was delayed. Almost missed our Miami flight back to Toronto because of that. One American said “look at those crazy Canadian girls running in airport.” First thing back home is feeling extremely cold in 20ish temperature, but home sweet home :”)

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5am at Flores, adios Guatemala!

I have to thank Centennial College for this amazing opportunity.Thank all the staffs from World Renew. Thank you Marg, Roya & Jo! Although we faced many ups and downs in this trip, extreme deprivation of veggies, tears and laughter, it was an experience that could only be experienced. It made me question my values, tested my limits, and forced me to grow. Thank you Guatemala! Someone told me this quote during this trip “You have to do other won’t, so you can have other can’t.” and of course my own quote “IT’S ONCE IN A LIFETIME!!!

Cheers hasta la próxima!

Beidi Zong

Nursing Student Centennial/Ryerson

here’s a little more amazing photos, enjoy 🙂

Last day at Guatemala
Last day in Guatemala

DSC_0974 (2)our daily breakfast

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first night!
first night!
Halo Marg!
Halo Marg!

Flores street

Even the Pastor was working with us making the menstrual pads. A big THANK YOU to you Sir :)
Even the Pastor was working with us making the menstrual pads. A big THANK YOU to you Sir 🙂
hahahaha our feet were swollen, have to lift it UP!
hahahaha our feet were swollen, have to lift it UP!

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