A Memorable study trip: FLIP-Peru

I am thankful to Centennial college for organising Faculty Led International Program. It was an honor to be the part of the FLIP -Peru program. Along with my ten other classmates and two faculty members (Prof. Xavier Aguirre and Prof. Marco). Our journey began on Feb 22, 2020. We had a daily visit to IESTP – illimo to work on pilot plant. Along with IESTP, we visited few other places such as Guinea pig farm, apiary, National Institute of Agricultural research and Gandules internationals.

On day one we visited Guinea pig farm where we learned about rearing of the pigs. Later we headed to see the IESTP pilot plant. On day two, we visited apiary where we saw honey bees, artificial honey combs and equipment to obtain honey.  Day three, we visited international institute of agricultural research where we learned about the natural media of pest control (Using insects and larva). Day four we visited one of the biggest facilities in Peru “Gandules Internationals”. Day five, was scheduled to visit farms and fields of Gandules Internationals. Day six, we utilised for cultural activities where we visited three amazing museums.

The IESTP pilot plant is designed for the production of jam, yoghurt, pickles, cheese and honey. They have few modern equipment which are enough to start production for small scale business. The professors and employees of the institute are very hardworking and trying their best to start the plant as soon as possible. I am very glad that I also contributed something to help them. The task was given to us was to develop process flow chart and diagram for jam, pickles and yogurt production. We all tried our best to develop those. For their better understanding, we translated those charts in Spanish. We also got chance to do premises inspection which was a great learning experience. The visit at Gandules International was amazing. I learned a lot about pickle facility and GMPs. I saw practically what I learned so far during the course of three semsters. We also visited their farms and fields to see how and what technology they use to grow their vegetables especially bell peppers and jalapeno.

The Peruvian people are very humble, kind and warm. They respect their visitors and try to provide best hospitality. Our cultural activities began with dinner party at guinea pig farm owner’s house. Next day we visited three museums where we learned about the Peruvian ancestors and their culture. We returned home safely on march 2, 2020.

Overall the experience of FLIP Peru program was amazing and memorable. I would like to thank #SaGE for organising such a wonderful study trip. Our instructors, prof. Xavier and Prof. marco took care of all of us and made sure of our safety. It was a safe and pleasant journey. I will never forget the FLIP Peru trip.

Thank you.

Amanjyotkaur Banwayat

#FLIP-Peru (Food Science Technology)

 

 

There and back again.

 

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An hour and a half hiking to a waterfall

The title is a reference to Tolkien, more precisely to Bilbo Baggins. Why? Well, because just like Bilbo, I have been on an adventure with a group of people almost unknown but returned with friends.

Our journey through the Dominican Republic aimed to look closely at how community economic development works. Community economic development happens when a community, government, and business work together to improve the quality of life in a place such as TUR!SOPP (Operational Partnership Public-Private Project in Tourism) has done. There, in Puerto Plata city, we spent eight intense days learning.

Learning from Juanin how to use our knowledge in favour of the community and creating opportunities.

Learning from Sandra how to transform realities regardless if the resources are denied.

Learning from Alexis how to save the environment and at the same time bring income to home.

Learning how to be determined with Sally.

Learning how to be welcoming hosts from Mr. Tim Hall, Señor Orlando Doña Julia.

Learning how to absorb knowledge wherever it is from my teachers Linor and Rachel.

Learning from my friends how to support and take care of each other. We had two birthday parties!

Learning from myself how to make my week productive, physically active and enjoyable at the same time.

In addition to formal learning by Ambra and Juan Pablo.

However, learning is just one of the many products that I bring from this trip. Being part of the workgroup to design activities using a community-based tourism approach is another reward from this trip. Understanding how to use community assets to improve local tourism will be valuable in my career. Besides, of course, all the tours around the beautiful city, the hiking and waterfalls, the delicious food at Tubagua Lodge and Sandra’s restaurant, the traditional Merengue and my dance class, thank you Rita, the smiles and hugs. 

Now it is time to practice all learning because being there brought me memories from my last jobs in Brazil where I worked inside the communities like Puerto Plata, and I miss that.

Thanks to Sage, who splendidly provided everything for this trip since the beginning. The Flip Dominican Republic 2020 is among my unforgettable experiences. I wish to say to Centennial students pay attention to the Sage website and take every opportunity they offer. You won’t regret it. 

Luciano de Lima
Community Development Work student

 

It felt like home…

This opportunity was completely amazing! How often you have the chance to go to a wonderful country to learn about your program and at the same time share with your classmates. My Global Experience was in the beautiful Dominican Republic. My trip started with nostalgia, the first time that I saw Dominican people, the sun, the landscape, I immediately remembered home. I did not expect that everything was so similar to my home country but I was there experiencing the warmth and happiness of the people, eating delicious food, and allowing me the opportunity to reconnect with my roots.

We stayed in an eco-lodge; the cabins were very particular, very artisanal. We share our space with many animals, it was like finding this balance to coexist with these interesting creatures. Our schedule was very fascinating, every day we did something different but always related to our program. When you have the opportunity to see the things that people are doing for their community, you feel motivated. It was a shot of reality but also an appreciation for the work of these human beings. Although we are kilometers away from them, the goal is still the same. To contribute to our society no matter the context, the country, the people, the approach. Every effort impacts positively on the community. This experience gave me another perspective of life and it was a reminder of why I decided to come to Canada, to study a profession that is oriented to the social field. The truth is that I am not here just for my benefit. I am here also looking for a better life for my family and my community.

Being there and having the opportunity to share with my classmates and professors is the other aspect that I will always keep in my heart. You realized how amazing people are. I learned from the community, I learned from my professors, I learned from my classmates. These people were an open book that offered me the opportunity to grow spiritually and intellectually next to them. This experience brought the best of us, the support that was given from each other is invaluable. This experience was the opportunity to reconnect with your roots, with your peers, with your thoughts, and your inner child.

Marian Torres

Community Development Work 

Sorrow Can Make Way for Triumph

Written by Fadzaiishe Rebecca Ziramba:

I used to tell stories through dance. Each leap, twist, and turn held great emotion. I shared secrets through dance. I told of my sorrow and I told of my joy.

My dance journey began in my grandmother’s house in Zimbabwe circa 2003 when the vibrant sounds of Africa led me to move in jubilance. I instinctively loved to dance. When I encountered YouTube and its dance tutorials at the age of 10 I began to learn what seemed to come naturally. I leapt and twirled throughout my living room until I began to make sense of rhythm and my body and melody became one.

It wasn’t shocking when I chose to attend an art focused secondary school to pursue dance. I felt at home on the dance floor, at home in my bodysuit and dance shoes.

One fateful day marked the end of my dance career. It was not an ominous or eerie day. I certainly couldn’t have guessed what was to come. Like most days when tragedy occurs, it was normal, filled with the normal activities of a high school student. Pain has a way of screaming into normalcy.

I sauntered into my dance class, changed into my leotard and took to the stage. I leapt into the air as I performed a “grand jete” (a jump in which a dancer springs from one foot to land on the other with one leg forward and the other stretched backward while in the air).  I expected to land square on both feet. I did not. My knee dislocated mid-air and I fell with a thunder to the floor (on my knee I might add). That fateful day likely changed the course of my life.

The months that followed included ugly knee brace wearing, intensive physical therapy, and the warning from a doctor to seize dancing. “You have a condition in which your knees dislocate,” a doctor told me.

“You’ll be in a wheel chair by the time you are 40 if you do not stop dance training now.”

I did not want to obey that instruction, yet in tears, I did.

I dropped dance and began to pursue visual storytelling.

It’s sad isn’t it? Don’t you like I do, wonder what I might have been as a dancer had I continued?

Sorrow can make way for triumph if we allow it.

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Fadzaiishe Living Her Best Life in New York

 

 

I began to focus on other interests I’d seemingly ignored; writing, photography, film, visual arts. I excelled in these art forms and these art forms led me to journalism, namely multimedia storytelling. Multimedia storytelling led me to an opportunity to document a New York dance FLIP. I travelled with 16 dedicated Story Arts Centre dance performance students. I observed as they danced with passion. I journeyed to notable dance studios like the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. I’d only dreamt of such things.

It feels like my story turned full circle doesn’t it?

52674291_624654731307424_8033515028978073600_oToday, I still tell stories. Through poetry, prose, photography, and video, I tell stories brimming with truth and emotion. I share secrets through storytelling. I not only tell of my own sorrow and joy, but that of others.

 

 

Before and After: A New York City Heart Makeover

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Captured by Fadzaiishe Rebecca Ziramba

Written by Fadzaiishe Rebecca Ziramba:

Few dance performers are granted the opportunity to leap through New York, to dance to the melodies of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Steps on Broadway, and the Broadway Dance Center. There are few whose feet greet the streets of what is known to be dance central, New York City (NYC).

It is quite understandable that 16 graduating Story Arts Centre dance performance students embraced the opportunity to travel to NYC on a dance expedition with great excitement.

52596126_624639091308988_3429045229917831168_oOn the morning of Feb. 19, Ashley Cole-Daley, 19, Tameka Hendricks, 19, and Sydney Usselman 19, arrived at the Story Arts Centre in the wee hours of the day, around 5 a.m. to be exact. They anxiously loaded bags laden with enough dance clothing for four days on a giant Great Canadian Coach bus as they considered the 12-hour journey ahead. Much of it would be spent sleeping. While awake, they spoke of the anticipation and zeal for the trip.

“I’ve never been outside of Canada,” said Cole-Daley.

“(I’ve been) on Google a lot. (I have been searching), ‘What can I bring? What is New York? What are the people like? Is it like Toronto?’”

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Ashley Cole-Daley Captured by Fadzaiishe Rebecca Ziramba

Cole-Daley who started to dance at the age of eight after attending a Caribbean dance event was most excited to experience the dance culture in a different city. She was particularly eager to participate in the Hush Hip Hop Tour, a tour of New York as the birthplace of Hip Hop hosted by the Museum of the City of New York.

 

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Tameka Hendricks Captured by Fadzaiishe Rebecca Ziramba

Likewise, Hendricks who began to dance at the age of six and is well versed in many forms of dance looked forward to the activities planned on the itinerary.

“I’m excited to see the dance scene and the Broadway shows. I’m (also) excited to learn about Alvin Ailey because we get to see that studio,” she said.

Usselman, who participated in the trip the previous year as a first year student offered a distinct perspective.

“I think an overall group bond will be different,” Usselman said.

“This year, with everyone together, it’s going to be a full group experience.”

At the end of the trip, as dancers sauntered onto the bus, bodies aching from three days of rigorous dance training, their experiences equaled their initial thoughts about the trip.

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Sydney Usselman Captured by Fadzaiishe Rebecca Ziramba

Usselman’s love for NYC was reignited.
“I love the hustle and bustle of NYC, how crazy it is all the time. Everyone’s always just kind of running around. Everyone has a purpose and it’s really cool to see,” said Usselman.

Hendricks enjoyed the extraordinary dance training she received in NYC.

“I have never really done anything like this; the drop-in classes in another country. I felt like it was such a good experience. And I feel like it made me work even harder,” said Hendricks.

Cole-Daley who captured an impressive 629 photographs throughout the trip appreciated the opportunities she believes the trip unearthed for her and other students.

“New York being one of the cities with a huge dance scene, I think that’s great for dancers because they can see what they have outside of their hometown. I’m very grateful that I had this opportunity to travel to New York and experience dance here,” she said.

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New York View Captured by Fadzaiishe Rebecca Ziramba

 

 

 

My Peruvian Experience: Culturally Enriching and Personally Fulfilling

By Cindy Tieu (Peru: February 21, 2019 – March 3, 2019)

A map of the regions we stayed at: Illimo and Chiclayo in Lambayeque, and the Lima District

I spent my reading week travelling with ten students and two faculty members to and from Peru as part of Centennial College’s Faculty Lead International Program (FLIP). In summary, we spent 1.5 days in the capital – Lima, and 7 days in their fourth largest city – Chiclayo (located in the Lambayeque region of Peru). During the week (Monday-Friday), we would commute an hour from Chiclayo to Illimo where we worked at the Instituto de Educaciόn Superior Technolόgico Publico (IESTP), providing our recommendations for their pilot plant. Our week was very busy, with an industrial site visit each morning, followed by working on the pilot plant in the afternoon up until and sometimes after dinner as well. We wanted to ensure that we provided our Peruvian partners with the best quality recommendations we could to strengthen their path to success.

Ministry of Education & Impact of Centennial College


At the Ministry of Education on our very first day in Lima.
Photo by: Thanh Sang Huynh

On our first day in Lima, we visited the Ministry of Education and shared our views on the importance of education and hands on experience. This meeting was an eyeopener, hearing from the ministry representatives how important education is for the students to give them hope for a better life. We also heard about the impact of Centennial College’s involvement with CiCAN (Colleges and Institutes of Canada). The goal of the partnership is to help strengthen technical skills and training in the food industry for students in Illimo, Lambayeque, to help prepare the students for employment.

In Lambayeque, we also had the opportunity to meet with the regional government. We acted as support to our Peruvian partners to gain funding and prioritize education for the students in Illimo. A press release of the meeting can be found here: https://www.regionlambayeque.gob.pe/web/noticia/detalle/26831?pass=Mg==

Peruvian Culture & Food

Anytime we had the opportunity to interact with someone in Peru, they always asked if we enjoyed their food. The answer was an obvious yes! In preparation for the trip, I had a list of foods I wanted to try with anticucho (beef heart) and ceviche (cured raw fish) being at the top. Lima, Chiclayo, and Illimo did not disappoint. I especially loved the home cooked feel of the dishes from Chiclayo and Illimo, with almost all dishes in some form of saltado (stir fry), like lomo saltado or polo saltado. The second thing the Peruvians are very proud of is Chiclayo known as the City of Friendship. This was very evident with all the Peruvians we interacted with. Even with a significant language barrier, everyone was very welcoming to us during our stay. Our Peruvian partners spent every moment with us from our very first day in Chiclayo up until we passed security at the airport to leave Chiclayo. They stayed with us during dinners and took us to industrial visits, museums, and as much site seeing as we could squeeze into our busy schedules. They made sure that our trip was not only filled with lots of work, but enjoyable and culturally enriching.

Industrial Site Visits

In total, we visited five industrial sites in Lambayeque: Guinea Pig Farm, Animal Feed Production Facility, Banana Plantation, Bee Apiary, and Gandules International. I learned about:

  • the challenges of breeding guinea pig in hot climates and the different characteristics of different breeds
  • the variety of animal feeds one small scale facility can produce
  • Peruvians wanting to expand the banana market in Peru to have a sustainable business both internationally and nationally
  • the value of the Queen Bee (in monetary value and its role in the colony)
  • the functionality of a larger scale production facility for international exports of peppers and mangos

IESTP Work & Students

Prior to our departure, our group had been working very hard to research and compile documents to be applied to a dairy production facility in Illimo. Our goal was to work on the Pre-Requisite Plans, specifically the Premises, Receiving & Storage, Equipment, Personnel, Sanitation & Pest Control, and Recall System. This is something we study extensively in our Food Safety Management class in our final semester of the Food Science Technology Program. We were divided into groups to further become expertise on butter, yogurt, and cheese, something we studied in our Food Processing and Technology classes taken in Semester 4 and 5.

Once we arrived at the IESTP, we got to see the beginning stages of the pilot plant and the equipment to be used for the production of butter, yogurt, cheese, and the addition of jam. The structure of the building is there, but there is much more construction to be done before it is ready for production. Over the course of four days, we worked as a group to provide our recommendations and technical background on the production facility, procedures and training to be done, and processing of each product to ensure food safety and quality. We did not have access to internet at the facility and had a very poor connection back at the hotel, so we heavily relied on our knowledge and each other as a team to provide quality content for our Peruvian partners. We wrote SOPs and SSOPs, designed product flow charts and diagrams, developed a traceability program, and provided general recommendations on premises, sanitation, pest control, and GMPs training. The pilot plant will not only be able to produce product for local sales, but to also serve as a teaching facility for the students enrolled at the IESTP to further prepare them for the workforce.

The highlight of my trip was interacting with the students there, and learning about the impact of our visit and the values and hard work of each student. We had the opportunity to speak with the students who took off a day of work to welcome us at the institute. Most of the students are young, but they hold much more experience in the agricultural field than I do as a Food Scientist working in the industry at present. They’ve spent their entire lives working in the field, and their passion can be seen through their commitment to education and the industry. Although there was a language barrier, I could feel the appreciation and the excitement the students had for us being there – something that we hopefully conveyed on our end as well. We were hearing about the impact Centennial College has and will continue to make for our Peruvian partners, but it wasn’t until this point that I truly felt humbled because the students and the professors at the IESTP made an impact on me, bringing value to this trip. I feel incredibly grateful for this opportunity to share and to learn, realizing that language barrier is nothing compared to our shared passion in the food industry which crosses cultures and countries.

Puerto Plata and Community Based Tourism

By Sara Archambault

Being given the opportunity to travel thousands of kilometres away with 11 of my classmates and 2 of my instructors to the beautiful Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic was a once in a lifetime experience. It was humbling and eye-opening to the way in which other people live in different places. The first thing I noticed was the people and how friendly and kind they were to us, regardless of what they may be experiencing and that caused me to feel a great appreciation for my life back in Canada. I was flooded with emotions and a renewal of energy for change. I was finally able to look through the community development lens in real life situations while I endured this experience and I was able to relate it back to the community economic development principles.

Fort San Felipe in Puerto Plata

Some of the community-based tourism excursions that we were able to participate in was a cable car ride, a visit to Fort San Felipe with a monument to General Gregorio LuPeron, Sosua Beach, a hike to Los Charcos, an amber mine, a week stay at Tubagua Eco lodge, and the Pedro Garcia coffee village. These experiences were full of breathtaking views and once in a lifetime experiences, it also highlights many of what Puerto Plata has to offer to tourists. These experiences relate to the principles of community economic development because of the use of locally produced goods such as food products or handmade souvenirs. It also displays the local skill development of the community members by utilizing their skills, knowledge, and social capital to create income. I feel that community-based tourism is essential in getting money back into the economy of Puerto Plata because it does not see as many tourists as other communities, and it also gets tourists off of resorts and into local communities. CBT is a great way to bring back those tourists and for them to see what Puerto Plata has to offer and hopefully with the recent revitalization in tourism, their economy can get the kick-start that it needs

– Cultivate the habit of being grateful-

View from the cable car ride in San 
Felipede De Puerto Plata 
The view from the Tubagua Ecolodge Puerto Plata


Sosua Beach in Puerto Plata

Trip to Puerto Plata Sponsered by SAGE

Written by Abdifatah Hussein

The Trip

As a group of students we were offered the opportunity to visit the community of Puerto Plata and learn about the community development skills, observe the economy of the people, and build skills among other things. It was an eye-opening experience, where a student like me was able to see an entire world outside of Canada and experience something I wouldn’t have been able to without Sage.
We got to meet local community members that accepted us like family, help them with different initiatives, and immerse ourselves in the Dominican culture. The opportunity to observe the local economy as well, see the strengths and weaknesses associated with it, and make note of the opportunities of growth there helped us gain experience with international economies and how to help them with their various needs. Another amazing thing that we were able to do was have to opportunity to listen to a number of different speakers and guests who taught us a multitude of things that relate to our field and future career paths.

One of our amazing guests showing us how to really market and start off a business step by step.
The Centennial Team staying at the Ecolodge!

The Economy

The main reason we went to the Dominican Republic as a class was to observe their economy, analyze its strengths and weaknesses, and apply our Community Development techniques there. When people think of the DR the first thing that comes to mind for a lot of people is the resorts, and the party life on the beach. But as we had came to learn, this beautiful land had a lot more to offer then that.
The economy of the DR is comprised of a very intricate web of corresponding political bodies, agencies, and international organizations. One interesting thing I learnt is that the Japanese helped to boost the tourism for the DR, but only for a contracted amount of time. Aside from the tourism though unfortunately there is a huge gap between the wealthy and the poor. If you are not able to work with tourists, or know English it is hard to make a sustainable living for many Dominicans. We have noticed a paradigm shift in thinking though when it comes to economic development strategies, and local communities are now starting to take advantage of their local commodities and cultural hotspots. One that I wish to mention is the amazing coffee in the DR. There has been an effort to attract tourists to see the coffee manufacturing process, from the tree to the cup, and with the added bonus of seeing the locals sing to the beans it is a great experience they can capitalize on.

The People and the Experience

Overall this was an amazing eye-opener of an experience, and one that was a huge learning opportunity for a lot of us. For some it was the catalyst for them to realize what exactly they wanted to do in the community development field. For others it helped them learn more about the economic development of countries outside of their own. And for myself personally it was a chance to learn more about myself and how I can better interact with not just my classmates but with different kinds of people around the world.

The scenery was absolutely breathtaking, something that a lot of us did not expect. Waking up every morning to see the sun rise over the hills of Puerto Plata, going for 4 hour long hikes across the land just to dive into a beautiful lake and more was something that created a deep connection between nature and us all. But the most beautiful thing we encountered on our trip was the people. Every Dominican we met showed us a level of love and care that we don’t often see from strangers. When they found out we were there to do Community work as well they treated us with even more hospitality, and this is something I would like everyone who visits the DR to see, and not just the resorts that don’t help their communities. In conclusion this trip was an amazing life-changing experience that I must thank SAGE and Centennial College for giving me the opportunity to experience!

My Flip Experience 2019

Jennifer Keene

March 6th, 2019

Puerto Plata is a beautiful city located in The Dominican Republic and I feel extremely blessed to have experienced the gems throughout this city and the lovely people that live there. My stay at the Tubagua Ecolodge was truly a challenge for me but I’m so glad I pushed past my fears and made the best of it. I am not an outdoorsy type of lady and I have a serious fear of bugs but I didn’t want that to stop me from all that was ahead of me for the next 6 days. I got to experience hiking to “God’s swimming pool” a beautiful waterfall located 40 mins away from the lodge and it was AMAZING! Walking through the hills and valleys was exhilarating and it made feel like I could conquer the world! Me and the FLIP team alongside our wonderful tour guide, encouraged each other, shared stories about challenges we faced and overcame and we kept each other smiling with our corny jokes. Many of us haven’t walked that long and far in a very long time, but we just kept going! I saw all my classmates and instructors in a whole new light and I felt so empowered by each of them whenever I would feel like it was getting tough. I compared that whole hiking experience to life, we go through ups and downs, we struggle, it gets tough but we just gotta persevere. Then when you get to the finish line you realize it was all worth it in the end and the challenges you faced weren’t so bad after all. Even leaning on a friend for support is necessary at times too, because we all face similar challenges.

All of the excursions really impressed me, I felt like our days were planned out well and taught us so much about community development and how successful organizations and projects can be if we use the tools we have learned and apply them. I assumed we would be doing a lot of work in the underserved communities so I was ready to get to work! but instead we heard very heartfelt stories, we learned about the failures and successes and we took a tour throughout the area and got a clear picture of what an underserved community in another country looks like.

This experience has taught me to push past any fears I have and to never assume nor have any expectations. I learned to just go for it, face everything head on, to never be afraid to ask for help or to ask a question and use every experience to help you be a better person. I plan to use all the tools I learned from being apart of a team with individuals who share the same passions and vision but have unique personalities, in my own projects and at work so we can be successful when trying to create an effective community based program etc.

You just gotta F-L-I-P!! (Forget Limitations & Instill Positivity)

FLIP PERU 2019

It was a great honor to be a part of Faculty Led International Program #FLIPPERU organized by #centennialcollege. Group of 10 students from Food science Technology department along with a professor and chair person started the trip. The program involved setting up a pilot plant at IESTP, ILLIMO by applying our technical knowledge in real time and helping them in designing the process flow for dairy and Jam products, developing #SSOPs, #GMPs and providing recommendations for all the #prerequisite programs. We also got the opportunity to meet the Ministry of Education, Lima and Regional Governor of Lambayeque. Apart from this, field tour to Banana plantation, Guinea Pig farm, Apicola Apiculutre, Agro farms were the highlight which gave us practical knowledge about the food industries.

Through this great opportunity I gained technical knowledge and most importantly learnt to work with a team of 10 students from different parts of the Country and achieve common goal.

Apart from all the technical experience it was a fun filled trip visiting museums and understanding their civilization, enjoyed with the group at Lima and Chiclayo beaches, buying souvenirs from local markets and most importantly exploring the local Peruvian food.

Thank you @centennial_sage #SaGEJourneys for providing such a wonderful opportunity. Many thanks to #Professor Xavier Aguirre and #Chair Steve Boloudakis for organizing and helping us, without their support this trip wouldn’t be possible. Special mention to the Illimo, Peruvian partners for their hospitality and kindness. #GlobalExperience

Thank you – Kalaiselvi Vasudevan