5 Things I Learnt About Yukata 浴衣

5 THINGS I LEARNT ABOUT YUKATA (浴 衣)

I always wonder and admire others from across the planet and was curious on what it is like growing up in another country, like Japan. But now I am living my dreams and in the SIP abroad Japan for the summertime. It’s the first time that the Nagoya Gakuin University in Japan have a partnership with Centennial College for this.  So, it’s exciting for me to be in Japan and in the first group of Centennial students to be part of this too!

One exciting planned activity from the program I tried was trying on a yukata for the first time and wearing it to the Atsuta Shrine.  Though I was curious on wearing one, it changed my perspective. It’s a lot of work. Here are 5 things I Learnt About yukata.

By: Sherry Ing, SIP Japan 2017 Participant

  1. During the summertime, there are many summer festival in Japan. A casual outfit that is worn by the people in Japan are ‘yukata’, during these festivals. They are a light cotton version of a kimono and are worn by everyone.
  2. There are many different types of obi ribbon 🎀 and how it is worn. In our experience, we worn a Tsuke obi. It was an interesting insight for me to wear a Tsuke obi, it is shorter and worn tight around the waist. When I taken a deep breath in, the obi sash would unwind itself and I had to have it readjusted again. Two people had to help me with it. The separate bow part is attached with a wire at the back of the obi. So, I had to make sure I don’t lean back on it when I sit in a chair with a back. Or it will go off centre from the back and you will have to readjust it.
  3. Geta (下駄) are wooden sandals worn without socks with the yukata. There are male and female version. The female version fits for smaller foot sizes only and for tinier foot. I have a wider foot, so part of my toes were outside of the small foot frame. Also, I bought Tabi socks with the geta. But, socks are worn for the colder season.
  4. You wear it with your undergarments. So, walking in the yukata, it takes small steps and movements, or everything will open up and undo itself. Also, you will sweat profusely, while trying to hold it all in.
  5. I wore a pink pattern with daisies. Usually, each person wears a different colour with a pattern that represents their age. Younger people wears brighter colour and bold motifs.
  6. Okay there is a sixth point in this.  It’s a lot of work! We had three people to learn from who skillfully tied the obi and wrapped the yukata on us. Walking in the yukata takes patience, but helps with the delicate movements.  Also, to sit down, it is recommended to sit with both legs to together and to the side or you will give out the wrong impression.
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